Language and Cognition Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
 by Ewelina Wnuk

Entries — January 2010

Reciprocal Constructions and Situation Type

Expressions like ‘John and Mary embraced (each other)’ represent complex situations where symmetry entails that each participant plays each of the two semantic roles (John embraced Mary, and Mary embracedMore →

Put Project: The Cross-Linguistic Encoding of Placement Events

How similar are the event concepts encoded by different languages? So far, few event domains have been investigated in any detail. The PUT project extends the systematic cross-linguistic exploration ofMore →

Repair Sequences in Interaction

This sub-project is concerned with analysis and cross-linguistic comparison of the mechanisms of signaling and redressing ‘trouble’ during conversation. Speakers and listeners constantly face difficulties with many different aspects ofMore →

Building a Corpus of Multimodal Interaction in your Field Site

Research on video- and audio-recordings of spontaneous naturally-occurring conversation in English has shown that conversation is a rule-guided, practice-oriented domain that can be investigated for its underlying mechanics or structure.More →

Infant Pointing (9-15 Months) in Different Cultures

There are two tasks for conducting systematic observation of child-caregiver joint attention interactions. Task 1 – a “decorated room” designed to elicit infant and caregiver pointing. Task 2 – videotapedMore →

Time in Space

How do different languages and cultures conceptualise time? This question is part of a broader set of questions about how humans come to represent and reason about abstract entities –More →

Emotion Categories in Language and Thought

Emotion has been a core domain for investigating the relative roles of biology and culture in human cognition. The goal is to investigate cross-cultural emotional categories in language and thought.More →

The Language of Taste

The underlying physiology of taste is far better understood than that of smell. There are five types of receptor, namely for sweet, salty, sour, bitter and umami (glutamic acid). InMore →

The Language of Olfaction

What resources do languages have for describing smells? Is there dedicated vocabulary for encoding olfaction, and if so what are the types of distinctions that are encoded? And, finally, howMore →

The Language of Touch

Newborn infants learn about the world around them through touch. Piaget famously noted the importance of manual and oral exploration of objects for developing spatial cognition and knowledge of theMore →