Language and Cognition Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
 by the ≠Akhoe Project

Entries — August 2011

Entries from 1999 Field Manual now available

We’ve just added a dozen entries from the 1999 Field Manual. These include questionnaires on Motion Lexicalisation and Motion Description, Event Integration and Demonstratives. There is also some unique elicitationMore →

Event Representation and Event Complexity: General Introduction

How do we decide where events begin and end? In some languages it makes sense to say something like Dan broke the plate, but in other languages it is necessaryMore →

Hypotheses Concerning Basic Locative Constructions and the Verbal Elements Within Them

Languages differ widely in terms of how they encode the fundamental concepts of location and position. For some languages, verbs have an important role to play in describing situations (e.g.,More →

1999 Demonstrative Questionnaire: “This” and “That” in Comparative Perspective

Demonstrative terms (e.g., this and that) are key to understanding how a language constructs and interprets spatial relationships. They are tricky to pin down, typically having functions that do notMore →

Deixis and Demonstratives

Demonstratives are key items in understanding how a language constructs and interprets spatial relationships. They are also multi-functional, with applications to non-spatial deictic fields such as time, perception, person andMore →

General Questions About Topological Relations in Adpositions and Cases

The world’s languages encode a diverse range of topological relations. However, cross-linguistic investigation suggests that the relations IN, AT and ON are especially fundamental to the grammaticised expression of space.More →

Eliciting Contrastive Use of Demonstratives for Objects Within Close Personal Space

Contrastive reference, where a speaker presents or identifies one item in explicit contrast to another (I like this book but that one is boring), has special communicative and information structureMore →

Story Book Stimulus for The Elicitation of External Possessor Constructions and Dative Constructions (“The Circle of Dirt”)

How involved in an event is a person that possesses one of the event participants? Some languages can treat such “external possessors” as very closely involved, even marking them onMore →

The ECOM Clips: A Stimulus for The Linguistic Coding of Event Complexity

How do we decide where events begin and end? In some languages it makes sense to say something like Dan broke the plate, but in other languages it is necessaryMore →

A Questionnaire on Event Integration

How do we decide where events begin and end? Like the ECOM clips, this questionnaire is designed to investigate how a language divides and/or integrates complex scenarios into sub-events andMore →