Language and Cognition Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
 by Penelope Brown

Event Representation (22 entries)

The Event Representation project explores event packaging across languages and in language acquisition.

(10 entries)

The ECOM Clips: A Stimulus for The Linguistic Coding of Event Complexity

How do we decide where events begin and end? In some languages it makes sense to say something like Dan broke the plate, but in other languages it is necessaryMore →

A Questionnaire on Event Integration

How do we decide where events begin and end? Like the ECOM clips, this questionnaire is designed to investigate how a language divides and/or integrates complex scenarios into sub-events andMore →

A Questionnaire On: Motion Lexicalisation and Motion Description

How do languages express ideas of movement, and how do they package features that can be part of motion, such as path and cause? This questionnaire is used to gainMore →

Cut and Break Clips

How do different languages treat a particular semantic domain? It has already been established that languages have widely varied words for talking about “cutting” and “breaking” things: for example, EnglishMore →

Event Representation and Event Complexity: General Introduction

How do we decide where events begin and end? In some languages it makes sense to say something like Dan broke the plate, but in other languages it is necessaryMore →

Questionnaire on Event Realization

“Event realisation” refers to the normal final state of the affected entity of an activity described by a verb. For example, the sentence John killed the mosquito entails that theMore →

Intransitive Predicate Form Class Survey

Different linguistic structures allow us to highlight distinct aspects of a situation. The aim of this survey is to investigate similarities and differences in the expression of situations or eventsMore →

‘Logical’ Connectives in Natural Language: A First Questionnaire

It has been hypothesised that human reasoning has a non-linguistic foundation, but is nevertheless influenced by the formal means available in a language. For example, Western logic is transparently relatedMore →

Motion Elicitation: “Moving ‘in(to)’” and “Moving ‘out (of)’”

How do languages encode different kinds of movement, and what features do people pay attention to when describing motion events? This task investigates the expression of “enter” and “exit” activities,More →

Background Questions for the “Enter”/”Exit” Research

How do languages encode different kinds of movement, and what features do people pay attention to when describing motion events? This document outlines topics concerning the investigation of “enter” andMore →