Language and Cognition Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
 by Mark Dingemanse

Event Representation (22 entries)

The Event Representation project explores event packaging across languages and in language acquisition.

(10 entries)

Event Representation and Event Complexity: General Introduction

How do we decide where events begin and end? In some languages it makes sense to say something like Dan broke the plate, but in other languages it is necessaryMore →

Questionnaire on Event Realization

“Event realisation” refers to the normal final state of the affected entity of an activity described by a verb. For example, the sentence John killed the mosquito entails that theMore →

Intransitive Predicate Form Class Survey

Different linguistic structures allow us to highlight distinct aspects of a situation. The aim of this survey is to investigate similarities and differences in the expression of situations or eventsMore →

‘Logical’ Connectives in Natural Language: A First Questionnaire

It has been hypothesised that human reasoning has a non-linguistic foundation, but is nevertheless influenced by the formal means available in a language. For example, Western logic is transparently relatedMore →

Motion Elicitation: ‘Moving ‘in(to)” and ‘Moving ‘out (of)”

How do languages encode different kinds of movement, and what features do people pay attention to when describing motion events? This task investigates the expression of “enter” and “exit” activities,More →

Background Questions for the ‘Enter/Exit’ Research

How do languages encode different kinds of movement, and what features do people pay attention to when describing motion events? This document outlines topics concerning the investigation of “enter” andMore →

Posture Verb Survey

Expressions of human activities and states are a rich area for cross-linguistic comparison. Some languages of the world treat human posture verbs (e.g., sit, lie, kneel) as a special classMore →

Story Book Stimulus for The Elicitation of External Possessor Constructions and Dative Constructions (“The Circle of Dirt”)

How involved in an event is a person that possesses one of the event participants? Some languages can treat such “external possessors” as very closely involved, even marking them onMore →

Motionland Films (v. 2): Referential Communication Task with Motionland Stimulus

How do languages express ideas of movement, and how do they package different components of moving, such as manner and path? This task supports detailed investigation of motion descriptions. TheMore →

Caused Positions

What kinds of resources do languages have for describing location and position? For some languages, verbs have an important role to play in describing different kinds of situations (e.g., whetherMore →