Language and Cognition Department, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
 by Olivier le Guen

Event Representation (22 entries)

The Event Representation project explores event packaging across languages and in language acquisition.

(10 entries)

Event Representation and Event Complexity: General Introduction

How do we decide where events begin and end? In some languages it makes sense to say something like Dan broke the plate, but in other languages it is necessaryMore →

Questionnaire on Event Realization

“Event realisation” refers to the normal final state of the affected entity of an activity described by a verb. For example, the sentence John killed the mosquito entails that theMore →

Intransitive Predicate Form Class Survey

Different linguistic structures allow us to highlight distinct aspects of a situation. The aim of this survey is to investigate similarities and differences in the expression of situations or eventsMore →

‘Logical’ Connectives in Natural Language: A First Questionnaire

It has been hypothesised that human reasoning has a non-linguistic foundation, but is nevertheless influenced by the formal means available in a language. For example, Western logic is transparently relatedMore →

Motion Elicitation: ‘Moving ‘in(to)” and ‘Moving ‘out (of)”

How do languages encode different kinds of movement, and what features do people pay attention to when describing motion events? This task investigates the expression of “enter” and “exit” activities,More →

Background Questions for the ‘Enter/Exit’ Research

How do languages encode different kinds of movement, and what features do people pay attention to when describing motion events? This document outlines topics concerning the investigation of “enter” andMore →

Put Project: The Cross-Linguistic Encoding of Placement Events

How similar are the event concepts encoded by different languages? So far, few event domains have been investigated in any detail. The PUT project extends the systematic cross-linguistic exploration ofMore →

Reciprocal Constructions and Situation Type

Expressions like ‘John and Mary embraced (each other)’ represent complex situations where symmetry entails that each participant plays each of the two semantic roles (John embraced Mary, and Mary embracedMore →

Kids’ Cut & Break

Kids’ Cut & Break is a task inspired by the original Cut & Break task (see MPI L&C Group Field Manual 2001), but designed for use with children as wellMore →

Folk Theories of Objects in Motion

There are three main strands of research which have investigated people’s intuitive knowledge of objects in motion. (1) Knowledge of the trajectories of objects in motion; (2) knowledge of theMore →